Posted by aionol | 21 DEC 2017

What to Do In the Unlikely Case Your Public Cloud Is Hacked – Part 1

Security is one of the biggest issues on the minds of CIOs when businesses migrate to the cloud. If you are doing your research and pick your cloud provider carefully, you can rest assured that safety and security in the cloud are taken care of. In general, the cloud is a pretty safe space. But unfortunately, it […]

Security is one of the biggest issues on the minds of CIOs when businesses migrate to the cloud. If you are doing your research and pick your cloud provider carefully, you can rest assured that safety and security in the cloud are taken care of. In general, the cloud is a pretty safe space.

But unfortunately, it is not always the case when cloud providers aren’t able to prevent security breaches. This can happen especially if they fail to provide up to date and smart STM solutions.

In the unlikely event you are finding yourself victim to an attack on your public cloud, there are a few things you should and shouldn’t do.

Here is what you SHOULD be doing:

What to Do In the Unlikely Case Your Public Cloud Is Hacked

What to Do In the Unlikely Case Your Public Cloud Is Hacked

Shut Down All Affected Devises

Once your system is compromised, the best thing you can do is to shut it down. This move might be able to save the data the hackers haven’t gotten access to yet. Shutting down your machines is the best action for damage control.

Report An Emergency To Your Provider

Your provider is the security expert you need to contact in case of emergency. They are likely to have exit and damage control plans in place. Cloud providers usually have automated procedures installed that can lock down your systems and locate the origin of the hack.

Picking the best cloud provider can save you the hassle of having to deal with security breaches and attacks.

Iono Inc has developed a STM solution that protects your data from hacks and attacks. Contact us to find out more.

For further information see – What to Do In the Unlikely Case Your Public Cloud Is Hacked – Part 2

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